Odor Control in WWTP

Odor Control in Waste Water Treatment Plants

Do you get complaints from your community related to odors from your plant? If these odors are similar to a “rotten eggs smell”, it is like that you have a problem with Hydrogen sulfide.

H2S is a toxic and potentially lethal gas found in both industrial installations and in waste water systems. Most odor-control solutions on the market just treat the odor from waste water systems. But they don’t prevent the bad odor from coming back. Since the mid 1990s, Yara has developed a specific nitrates based solutions that prevent the root cause of hydrogen sulfide, septicity, which is caused by a lack of oxygen.

Complete solutions include a package of product and services that will help you treat optimally, so you never dose more product then you need. Our team of experts offer services such as site assessment, trailing, dosing strategy, on-line telemetry (to control dosage on your site from a remote location), and storage equipment.

In the US and Canada, Yara uses Evoqua Water Technologies LLC as its exclusive distributor.
Please contact their Municipal Services Sales Team 941.359.7917 or Email: Email
You can read more about their Bioxide Biochemical Solutions. Further contact details available here.

The Dangers of Hydrogen Sulfide

Prevent smelly odors caused by hydrogen sulfide H2S emissions by using our portfolio of products which include specifically developed blends of nitrate that are highly efficient in the prevention of odor. These unpleasant rotten eggs odors or rotten cabbage like smells hide other potential problems to the sewer systems such as corrosion.

We market additional odor control products and solutions that offer a complete package to protect workers from exposure to this toxic gas, prolong the lifespan of infrastructure and prevent the spread of bad odors in the communities around waste water installations and sewers.

Odor Control in Waste Water Treatment

Our clients include municipalities, private operators of wastewater treatment networks and sewers who are facing odor complaints from their communities, but also industrial plants with their own wastewater treatment systems such pulp and paper manufacturers, dairies, breweries and slaugtherhouses.

Henri Groenen
Henri Groenen
VP, Industrial Chemicals, North America